Oct 192017

 

(We continue the rollout of Austin Weber’s ongoing series devoted to reviews of 2017 releases we haven’t previously covered. You can find Part 1 here, Part 2 here, Part 3 here, Part 4 here, and Part 5 here.)

In spite of what the naysayers will tell you, I’m of the opinion that there’s an absolutely ridiculous amount of good metal releases coming out all the time, many of them coming from new groups or independent groups that we’re just now catching onto for the first time.

This lengthy round-up has been in the works for awhile, but I kept adding more and more to the list of what I wanted to cover. Hopefully you will find something new you enjoy in each installment.

ComityA Long Eternal Fall

Comity are a long-running Parisian group who have always defied easy categorization and neat, simple explanations as to what they do. They’re a band I’ve been following since 2005. At that time, I was a bit late to the party when I first heard their 2002 debut The Deus Ex-Machina As A Forgotten Genius, but that ended up being a good time to get into them since they dropped a killer follow-up the next year, in 2006, called As Everything Is A Tragedy.

Oct 192017

 

The Wisconsin melodic black metal band Uhtcearu self-released their second album, For Darkness To Subside, in late July of this year. As a DIY release with nothing more than word of mouth behind it, the album nevertheless garnered heaps of praise across a range of metal-devoted sites, both large and small, including our own, and it has justly elevated Uhtcearu’s profile as a band worth watching very closely. Sometimes quality alone is enough to carry the day, even in an age when it’s harder than ever for bands to be noticed in the absence of label backing or the persistent push of a PR apparatus.

But there are undoubtedly many listeners out there who still haven’t yet discovered For Darkness To Subside, and who would embrace the album if only it could be put before them. And that’s where this new video enters the frame as a vehicle for spreading the word further.

Oct 192017

 

(We present Part 4 of a series of reviews by our Russian connoisseur of all things doom, Comrade Aleks, and today he shares impressions of, and music from, three more 2017 releases. Go here to check out Part 1, here for Part 2, and here for Part 3.)

Some say that Black Sabbath or Pentagram are the only real doom bands, some add that you shouldn’t forget Candlemass and Cathedral, then another one reminds us about My Dying Bride or Esoteric. Doom takes many forms.

It takes the form of Kafkian surrealistic mind journeys as Odradek Room show it. It may reveal itself through straight primordial riffs decorated with psycho or prog influences, as Vokonis preach. And it may appear in the melancholic tunes of Old Night. You never know… So choose your own doom. Here you will find three new aspects of the Doom Cult.

Oct 182017

 

(We continue the rollout of Austin Weber’s ongoing series devoted to reviews of 2017 releases we haven’t previously covered. You can find Part 1 here, Part 2 here, Part 3 here, and Part 4 here.)

In spite of what the naysayers will tell you, I’m of the opinion that there’s an absolutely ridiculous amount of good metal releases coming out all the time, many of them coming from new groups or independent groups that we’re just now catching onto for the first time.

This lengthy round-up has been in the works for awhile, but I kept adding more and more to the list of what I wanted to cover. Hopefully you will find something new you enjoy in each installment.

KLEXOSDEMO 2017

Now we return yet again to dark and eerie death metal with the 2017 demo from a new project based out of Lexington, Kentucky known as Klexos. The group plays within the murky and dissonant death metal style on their 2017 demo, but does so with more of a groove and doomy feeling to it that gives the two songs on this release their own vibe.

Oct 182017


< code >

 

It occurred to me that the tag I came up with for these round-ups of new tracks — “Random Fucking Music” — could be misconstrued. The idea wasn’t that this would be random music you could actually fuck to, although I guess you could fuck to some of it if you were like certain members of the non-human animal kingdom who pound away in a frenzy for a few minutes (or less) and then go off to find more food or take a shit, leaving the female of the species looking either confused or bored and wondering, “Is it in yet?”

Yeah, don’t remind me, I know human males do that too. I guess maybe an album-length funeral doom track could provide some reciprocal coital benefits, but I assume most people like to shift into a higher gear at some point, except for those who pass out somewhere along the way. I’ve never seen a sloth have sex. Might be worth investigating.

Oct 182017

 

(Vonlughlio provides this review of the debut album by the Italian/Russian brutal death metal band Interminable Corruptions.)

Back in 2016 while doing my top BDM albums list, I stumbled upon a band called Anomalistic (from Basil) who had released their sophomore album, Human Decimation, via Reality Fade Records, an up-and-coming BDM label based in Ukraine. That album ended up in my top 50 and I got the chance to meet (at least on FB) the owner of the label, Dimitry (a nice dude with an extensive knowledge in BDM). From that time on, I’ve been on the lookout for future Reality Fade releases.

Either at the end of 2016 or the beginning of 2017, the label announced the release of the Coprobaptized Cunthunter EP (a marvelous release) and Interminable Corruptions’ debut album, Xenodimensional Conflux.  I was not familiar with Interminable since they are a new band that had formed back in 2014 and had only released a demo and a split. Some lineup changes occurred before their full-length release, and who they now have as a vocalist is none other than Mr. Paolo Chiti (Ex-Putridity, Devangelic, and Antropofagus) — simply one of the best BDM frontmen!!! Everyone who is into the genre knows this name, and he is well-respected.

Oct 182017

 

(Our ally Gorger from Norway has again reached down beneath our radar screen and pulled up another group of underground gems, four of them this time. To find more of his discoveries, type “Gorger” in our search bar or visit Gorger’s Metal.)

Here’s four new (although that’s certainly not the right word) releases for you to hopefully find some enjoyment in. Due to coincidences, two of them are actually a year old. They’re all quite new to No Clean Singing, though, and as we all know, good music never grows stale.

Oct 182017

 

(Last summer we premiered a song from the new album by Planet Eater from Regina in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan, and now we present Andy Synn’s review of the album.)

As much as we enjoy a lot of fancy progressive, forward-thinking, paradigm-evolving bands here at NCS… sometimes we all just want something that rips.

Enter Western Canada’s (fantastically named) Planet Eater and their debut album, Blackness from the Stars.

Oct 172017

 

(We resume the rollout of Austin Weber’s ongoing series devoted to reviews of 2017 releases we haven’t previously covered. You can find Part 1 here, Part 2 here, and Part 3 here.)

In spite of what the naysayers will tell you, I’m of the opinion that there’s an absolutely ridiculous amount of good metal releases coming out all the time, many of them coming from new groups or independent groups that we’re just now catching onto for the first time.

This lengthy round-up has been in the works for awhile, but I kept adding more and more to the list of what I wanted to cover. Hopefully you will find something new you enjoy in each installment.

ANTHESISTHE AGE OF SELF

Anthesis are yet another killer band I was made aware of by my good friend and fellow obscure music junkie, Amir Ostrowsky. I was very impressed with the music here after he sent me The Age Of Self, so it definitely warranted coverage in this article.

Oct 172017

 

Two years have passed since the debut of Genevieve’s scathing debut album Escapism, and in connection with its release we premiered not only one of the first singles but also the album as a whole, which our Austin Weber described as “an invitation of nightmares and horror into our world”, “pitch-black and haunting”, a display of “immense hatred and chaos”, but also a record laced with surprises and overall “quite striking and brilliant” in its unconventional strategies.

Two years on, and Grimoire Records is gearing up to release the second full-length by this Maryland collective. Entitled Regressionism, it’s set for detonation on Black Friday, November 24, and we again find ourselves in the fortunate position of presenting a first taste of the new music, in the form of a harrowing experimental track named “No For An Answer“.

© 2009-2017 NO CLEAN SINGING Banner design by Dan Dubois, background design by groverXIII. Suffusion WordPress theme by Sayontan Sinha