Sep 192013

This is turning into a very nice week for fans of technically exuberant, blast-strength death metal. Yesterday we had the pleasure of premiering a new song by Rivers of Nihil and today we discovered that London-based Karybdis have also debuted a new single. The new track is named “Constellations”, and man, does it fly. It jabs and jumps and spins like a whirlwind, too.

The music is in constant motion, switching tempos and switching moods at will. It delivers a flurry of prize-fighter punches as well as a dreamy instrumental interlude . . . and there’s what sounds like a string quartet letting you down easy in the outro. And did I mention the bass drops? I did mention the technical exuberance, and there’s plenty of that in “Constellations” as well.

The drums, strings, and vocals were produced and recorded by Adam ‘Nolly’ Getgood and John Walker at Moles Studio, and the guitars and bass were produced and recorded by Karybdis. The whole thing sounds might nice. But wait! There’s more!

Aug 062012

(TheMadIsraeli returns to NCS after a break with this review of the new album by Karybdis, which we had the pleasure of premiering here.)

Ok, so I’m really fucking late on this and blah blah blah, really don’t give much of a fuck because I’m back now and NCS shall be restored to its former glory.  K?  We good with that?  Alright.

Talking about what is good music and what good music is in a public setting is near fucking impossible.  You’ve always got some post-modernist asshole wanting to tell you about opinions and about tastes who feels the need to remind you, condescendingly, that your opinion is only your opinion, as if it were their responsibility to keep your opinion in check.  Not theirs, of course.

Yeah, everyone has their own tastes, everyone has their preferences (as do I, for sure, tightly knit and strict ones), but I never have a problem finding things outside my own niche that I like.  At the same time, I think some music is simply undeniable, and that the only reason anyone would dislike it is because they care more about establishing and maintaining their identity rather than simply partaking in and enjoying the art.  Karybdis are a band I get such a feeling about.

Now, we already featured a stream of this album a couple weeks back, and if you all had good sense, you got on that shit pronto and broke your computer desks in half.  It’s just pure, unrelenting metal at its finest.

Jul 302012

On August 12, 2012, the Closing Ceremony will mark the end of the 2012 London Olympic Games.  Two days later, on August 14, Demonic Resurrection, Bloodguard, Karybdis, and one more band to be announced will finish off whatever is left of London with a free live show at The Unicorn Camden.

The Closing Ceremony of the Olympic Games will be entitled “A Symphony of British Music” and will be broadcast worldwide. The DR-Bloodguard-Karybdis show will be entitled “Darkness Over London” and it will not be broadcast anywhere. Only those fortunate enough to appear in person at The Unicorn will get to witness the darkness, and they will not have to endure an endless parade of commercials, or an endless parade of athletes. They will also not have to pay anything to enter the venue, because the show is free.

A total cast of 4,100 performers will take part in the London 2012 Closing Ceremonies. A somewhat smaller cast will take part in “Darkness Over London”. However, it is unlikely that they will be wearing ridiculous costumes, opting instead for tasteful band shirts, or no shirts at all. We have not been advised as to whether they will be wearing pants. It will not cost anything to find out what they are wearing or not wearing, because the show will be free.

Organizers of the Closing Ceremony have reported that the August 12 event will feature “some of the country’s most globally successful musicians, along with some of the industry’s stars of tomorrow”. This means it is highly unlikely that the Closing Ceremony will include any metal bands, and therefore it is highly likely that it will be boring as shit. “Darkness Over London”, however, will feature some terrifically ass-kicking metal by three rising stars in the only industry that matters — The Industry of Metal.

Jun 292012

Students of Greek mythology will recognize Kharybdis as the name of a sea monster, a spawner of whirlpools who together with Scylla created a smashing gauntlet of death from which few seafarers escaped. Karybdis is also the name of a smashing UK-based metal band whose mythology-themed debut album From the Depths we’re proud to stream for you in full today.

I’m almost (but not quite) at a loss for words to describe the music on From the Depths. It’s like a full-speed collision of a multitude of metal genres — most prominently, melodic death metal, groove metal, thrash, and hardcore, with different elements more dominant than others, depending on the song. Imagine a fusing of the musical styles of At the Gates, Lamb of God, The Black Dahlia Murder, and Darkest Hour. Or think about The Absence or the late, lamented The Famine — but don’t forget to throw in a few symphonic enhancements, a jazz guitar solo, and old-school breakdowns (the kind that break necks without being introduced by a bass drop).

You get Gothenberg galloping; jagged pneumatic riffing; blazing, layered melodic leads and swirling solo’s; booming bass lines you feel all the way through your core; wonderfully varied attacking drums; tempos that turn on a dime; and an impassioned vocalist (Rich O’Donnell) who has an extended range of unclean styles, from cavernous roars to cauterizing howls and paint-melting shrieks.

Also, every one of these high-voltage songs functions like a giant mosh-trigger — press play and you’ll be looking for the first solid object against which you can hurl yourself. But shit, this thing also includes string instrumentals that sweep and dance with elegance — and I’m talking about real strings (violin, viola, and cello), not the artifice of a synthesizer.

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